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Hookuaaina Rebuilding Lives From The Ground Up

ʻŌlelo Noeau: Aʻo (teaching and learning)

ʻAʻohe pau ka ʻike i ka hālau hoʻokahi. #203All knowledge is not taught in the same school.[One can learn from many sources.] E hoʻōki i ka hoʻina wale, o hōʻino ʻia mai ke kumu. #291One should never go home without [some knowledge] lest his teacher be criticized. E kuhikuhi pono i nā au iki a...

ʻŌlelo Noeau: Relating to ʻĀina (land)

Ēwe hānau o ka ʻāina. #387Natives of the land.[People who were born and dwelt on the land.] Hāhai nō ka ua i ka ululāʻau. #405Rain always follows the forest.[The rains are attracted to forest trees. Knowing this, Hawaiians hewed only the trees that were needed.] Hānau ka ʻāina, hānau ke aliʻi, hānau ke kanaka. #466Born...

Wai (Fresh Water)

Ua (Rain) ʻĀpuakea This is a general rain for Koʻolaupoko. Especially Kailua, Waimānalo and Kāneʻohe. ʻĀpuakea was a very beautiful woman, that out of jealousy perhaps, Hiʻiaka turned into rain.  “The ʻĀpuakea rain of Koʻolaupoko was named after ʻĀpuakeanui, the most beautiful woman in Kailua from the moʻolelo of the goddess Hiʻiakaikapoliopele.” (Akana & Gonzalez,...

ʻŌlelo Noeau: Relating to Kailua

Kailua Hawaiʻi palu lāʻī. #503Ti-leaf lickers of Hawaiʻi.[This saying originated after Kamehameha conquered the island of Oʻahu. The people of Kailua, Oʻahu, gave a great feast for him, not expecting him to bring such a crowd of people. The first to arrive ate up the meat, so the second group had to be content with...

Makani (Winds)

Malanai Ka Malanai is the gentle (northeast, according to some) breeze associated with Kailua. This wind is said to induce lovemaking. “Holopali is of Kaʻaʻawa and Kualoa,Kiliua is of Waikāne,Mololani is of Kuaaohe,Ulumano is of Kāneʻohe,The wind is for Kaholoakeāhole,Puahiohio is the upland wind of Nuʻuanu,Malanai is of Kailua,Limu-li-puʻupuʻu comes ashore at Waimānalo,ʻAlopali is of...

Ua (Rains)

ʻĀpuakea This is a general rain for Koʻolaupoko. Especially Kailua, Waimānalo and Kāneʻohe. ʻĀpuakea was a very beautiful woman, that out of jealousy perhaps, Hiʻiaka turned into rain. “The ʻĀpuakea rain of Koʻolaupoko was named after ʻĀpuakeanui, the most beautiful woman in Kailua from the moʻolelo of the goddess Hiʻiakaikapoliopele”.(Akana & Gonzalez, 2015, aoao xvi)...

Wahi Pana (Sacred & Celebrated Places)

ʻĀLELE(“it has flown”) Land area in the approximate center of Kailua, Oʻahu, formerly a plain called Kula-o-ʻĀlele, a sports area. Parker, Henry H. A Dictionary of the Hawaiian Language. 1922. The Board of Commissioners of Public Archives of the Territory of Hawaiʻi. Pūkuʻi, Elbert, & Moʻokini. Place Names of Hawaiʻi. 1974, 2004. University of Hawaiʻi...

Moʻolelo

Related To Kailua Edible Mud of Kawainui Mākālei No Ka ʻĪlio Moʻo No na wahi a na’Lii e makemake ai e noho i ka wa kahiko ma ka Mokupuni o Oahu Nei Compiled by Danielle Espiritu, Education Specialist

Brief Timeline

Prior to 1778 – Kailua planted primarily in kalo long before Western contact. 1831-1832 – 760 residents in Kailua. (353 males, 275 females, 61 boys, 71 girls) 1835 – 762 living in Kailua. 1846 – 749 living in Kailua. December 1846 – Tax assessment (Kingdom of Hawaiʻi) lists 71 ʻili ʻāina in the ahupuaʻa of...

Māhele ʻĀina (Land Divisions)

Mokupuni (Island):Oʻahu Moku (District):Koʻolaupoko Ahupuaʻa:Kailua ʻIli ʻĀina: Anoni Alalapapa Alawai Auloa Haimilo/Pehialii/Moopilau Hapakapa Hiwapoo Hualea Kaakepa Kaakepa Kaalelekamani Kaanokama Kaelepulu Kahanaiki Kahoa Kahoa Kaioa Kaipolia Kalaekoa Kalaiaoa Kaluaikoa Kamakalepo Kamakalepo Kamakalepo Kamakalepo Kanahau Kaoha Kaohia Kaohia Kaohia Kapalai* Kapaloa Kapia Kaulu Kaulu Kawailoa Kawailoa Kawainui Keahupuaa Kahupuaanui Keolu Kihuluhulu Kionaole Kionaole Kuailima Kuapuaa Kuapuaa Kuapuaa...

Meet Benji

Aloha e nā poʻe ʻo Hawaiʻi! My inoa is Benji Ah Sing and I hope this message finds you well. For the past two years I have had the privilege of being an intern here at Hoʻokuaʻāina. To my recent delight Iʻve also been honored with the promotion to co-farm manager entailing new kuleana and a greater sense of management skills. My time here with our organization has aided in molding the kāne that I am on my way to becoming.

Meet Keʻalohilani

Aloha! I am Keʻalohilani and I am from Kapaʻakea in Mōʻiliʻili. My first summer working here in 2018 was a transitioning mode for me. Fast forward a year and a half, I am still at the loʻi thanks to the timing and welcoming crew that have allowed me to grow with Hoʻokuaʻāina.

Mele Wai

Lā, ʻŌpua, Ua, Kuahiwi, Wailele, Kahawai, Punawai, Inu wai, Kahawai, Wailele, Kuahiwi, Ua ʻŌpua, Lā

Moʻolelo: Moe Kaoo I Ka Ai Lepo

This article comes from Ka Nupepa Kuokoa and was published on October 26, 1872. In it, the author, J. B. Keliikanakaole, recounts a story of Bernice Pauahi Bishop and Miriam Likelike Cleghorn as they journey from Hanakamalaelae, Heʻeia to the fishpond at Kawainui, Kailua, Oʻahu to taste the lepo ʻai ʻia (edible mud) found there.

Moʻolelo: Palila

This story teaches us the importance of being truthful and that evildoers will meet their match in the end. This moʻolelo also reminds us of the great power of Hina, one of the many names of the divine feminine and Cosmic Mother, being able to revive Palila from his cord state and gifting him with his magical club.

Moʻolelo: No Ka ʻīlio Moʻo

This story reminds us of the great abundance and high quality food that is able to be grown in Maunawili. Whereas Maunawili was a place to supply not only royalty with food, but also travelers coming to or from Honolulu. Maunawili was known as a “breadbasket” of the Koʻolau district, one of the foremost places to grow food, especially kalo. This moʻolelo is also a reminder for us of the values of mercy, forgiveness and truthfulness.

Moʻolelo: Mākālei

This story teaches us very important values. The first and foremost value is that everyone needs to be taken care of. This is the impetus for the entire tale. Olomana was held responsible by the amazing goddess Haumea, for neglecting her descendant.

Moʻolelo: Mai Hoopalaleha I Ke Kanu Kalo

This article was published in the Hawaiian language newspaper, Kuokoa Home Rule, on August 8, 1911. In it, the author speaks to the transition of land use in Honolulu, as many of the loʻi kalo were beginning to dry out. The author, unnamed, warns that nearly three hundred acres of Honolulu’s kalo lands, at the time in cultivation, will soon no longer be planted. In the end, the reader is called to action

Moʻolelo: Keahiakahoe

This moʻolelo speaks of three siblings living in Kāneʻohe, Koʻolaupoko, Oʻahu. One brother, Kahoe, was a kalo farmer, another, Pahu, a fisherman, and their sister, Loʻe, gathered iʻa (fish and other marine mammals) and limu (seaweed) along the seashore. As was the expectation of the time, they shared their resources together as an ʻohana. However, on one occasion, one of the siblings had been dishonest and withheld what should have been shared with the others. As the moʻolelo continues, this individual realizes their wrongdoing and learns a valuable lesson.

Hookuaaina Rebuilding Lives From The Ground Up

Hoʻokuaʻāina is located in the ahupuaʻa of Kailua at Kapalai in Maunawili on the island of Oʻahu. Get Directions.

For more information about our programs or how you can get involved please contact us.

916E Auloa Rd.

Kailua, HI 96734

mail

P.O. Box 342146

Kailua, HI 96734

follow us

Hookuaaina Rebuilding Lives From The Ground Up

Hoʻokuaʻāina is located in the ahupuaʻa of Kailua at Kapalai in Maunawili on the island of Oʻahu.

For more information about our programs or how you can get involved please contact us.

visit us

916E Auloa Rd.

Kailua, HI 96734

mail us

P.O. Box 342146

Kailua, HI 96734

email us

Reach Us At:

info@hookuaaina.org

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Hoʻokuaʻāina is a 501c3 Non-Profit Organization

© Hoʻokuaʻāina 2020 All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy | Site By Created By Kaui

Hoʻokuaʻāina is a 501c3 Non-Profit Organization

© Hoʻokuaʻāina 2020 All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy | Site By Created By Kaui

Hoʻokuaʻāina is a 501c3 Non-Profit Organization

© Hoʻokuaʻāina 2020 All Rights Reserved | Terms & Conditions | Privacy

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